marathon recovery

My post-marathon recovery plan and why runners need a post-season

img_9901

In the pain cave at the 2016 VIctoria Marathon

So far I’m having a fairly typical post-marathon recovery.

My legs are incredibly sore and I’m walking like a zombie. The head cold I got just before my race is still kicking around (because I ran a marathon instead of resting like a normal person). My underarms are still sore and chafed, so I’m applying lotion liberally and not wearing scratchy sweaters. My marathon hanger has subsided, and I’m ensuring I take in lots of protein to aid in muscle repair and recovery. And as usual, I totally compromised my immune system by running hard and have the worst fever blister ever covering 75% of my nose and a bit of my chin. It’s so bad I actually had to work from home today — I look like quasimodo with my poor nose and shuffle-limp. I’m currently locked away in the bell tower hunched over my computer, only lumbering downstairs occasionally for tea and snacks. (more…)

How to beat the post-marathon blues

Debbie and me just before the race on Oct. 13.

Debbie and me just before the marathon last year where I BQ’ed

You would think if you ran a marathon after 17 long weeks of training, hit a PR and achieved your goal of qualifying for the Boston Marathon without getting injured, you would be happy. Thrilled. Satisfied. It’s time to take it easy and go on living life, right?

Yes… but no.

It’s not that easy when you’re a runner. You have that day-after elation (or crushing sadness) of achieving (or not achieving) your goal. You tweet, Facebook and blog about your race and respond to messages like these for days: “Congrats! Well done!” or “You made the right choice to DNF, I’ve been there, it’s okay,” or “Heal up quickly! You’ll come back stronger!” After that, you get an email from the marathon photography company notifying you that your race photos are ready and you laugh/reminisce while browsing through them online (“that must have been near the end, look at my face! And what am I doing with my hands? I would never pay $50 for these!”). (more…)

So I finally went for a run yesterday…

I think this was from early in the race as I don't look like I'm dying yet.

I think this was from early in the race as I don’t look like I’m dying yet.

It’s been two whole weeks since the marathon. One week of complete rest and two weeks of no running.

I’ll admit, the whole not-running part has been a welcomed break. Though my foot didn’t hurt after the race and I didn’t end up breaking anything (thankfully), I can tell my body needed a break. The pads of my feet were actually quite sore, and my legs just felt tired and achy.

Of course, after a week of doing nothing, I got tired of sitting around and jumped right back in to weight training, picking up where I left off before taper.

Bad idea.

I definitely lost a lot of strength, and a workout that wouldn’t have cause any DOMS (delayed onset muscle soreness) before caused me to hobble around for days. For DAYS. At least I know my programmed workouts are effective 🙂 (more…)

Marathon recovery and how I plan to spend my “post-season”

IMG_0072

Definitely could not walk after the race!

It’s been four days since the marathon, and I’m still shuffling like a zombie.

Thankfully my foot is not hurting, and that weird ache I had is no longer there. I haven’t tried running, of course, so I don’t know for sure if it’s gone or just shifted to another part of my foot. Once I’m recovered and can actually go for a jog to find out, I’ll head to a sports doc anyway just to make sure.

So far my recovery plan has been to do as little as possible. I’ve never been this sore after a race before — usually I would have been stretching and foam rolling by now, but I can barely walk let alone put any pressure on my legs. I think today I might be able to stretch and do some light foam rolling, and hopefully stop popping the Ibuprofen. (more…)

%d bloggers like this: